Author: NASJE

Article Club Callinar on Thursday, May 11

Life Balance Wheel

Vicarious trauma. Compassion fatigue. Second-hand shock. Burnout. The populations that judicial educators serve are at great risk for these overwhelming professional challenges. How could and should our programming combat the effects of working with and around traumatic events? Join NASJE’s latest Article Club Callinar, where you will have the opportunity to discuss the article about vicarious trauma experienced by court employees. We have also two self-care inventories examples that you can take prior to the callinar or whenever you like.

The Promise of Restorative Justice: Reduced Pressure on Courts, Reduced Recidivism, Increased Public Trust in the Rule of Law

In a thought provoking session at NASJE’s 2016 Annual Conference in Burlington, Vermont, Dr. Johannes Wheeldon and the Honorable David Suntag offered the underlying premises of restorative justice — while attempting to respond to criminal acts, the justice system itself causes harm, and the participation of those in the justice system is often limited to hiring a lawyer to navigate complex procedures. This lack of participation by those whose lives are affected leads to a default society. Restorative justice, on the other hand, demands meaningful participation and affords an opportunity to articulate our needs.

Hidden Treasures on the NASJE Website

The Education and Curriculum Committee hosted its first “Article Club” call-inar for 2017 on February 23. The call-inar, Hidden Treasures on the NASJE Website, focused on the hidden gems within the website. The “explorers” led 17 participants through the many “caverns” to discover the treasures that comprise the website as the participants followed along on their computers.

The Best of Charleston

Charleston

Does business casual include khakis and open-toed shoes? It certainly does where we are going! NASJE’s Annual Conference is September 10-13, 2017, in Charleston South Carolina, where the average temperature for September is in the mid-80s. There is a lot to see and do in the area, especially if you want to add a day or two to your trip either before or after the conference. Here are some highlights!

“We Are Charleston”

We Are Charleston

This book and conference location are the inspiration for “ELO, Charleston, South Carolina and Race: An Experiential Approach”, which revisits the tragedy and explores how race remains a salient issue in society. The session will include a visit to Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where the murders occurred, on-site discussion of the tragedy and where the country and justice system are with regards to race.

Law Day 2017

law day 2017

Law Day is held every year on May 1 for the purpose of celebrating the role of law in our society and to cultivate a deeper understanding of the legal profession. This year’s theme is “The 14th Amendment: Transforming American Democracy.” ABA President Linda Klein’s videotaped message is a good way to begin learning about this year’s theme.

Karen Thorson Award Nominations Due March 31

Karen Thorson

Karen Thorson Award nominations are now being accepted by the NASJE Board. If you know a career judicial educator who has made significant contributions to the profession and to NASJE, consider nominating him or her for this award. Nominations are due by Friday, March 31, 2017. You will find a link to the nomination form in the NASJE Member Area.

2017 NASJE Conference Curriculum Planning is Underway

Charleston

The 2017 NASJE Conference will be held in Charleston, South Carolina on September 10-13, 2017, at the Francis Marion Hotel. The theme for the conference will be “Old meets New: incorporating fundamentals, instructional design and adult learning in the 21st century.” In collaboration with the Education and Curriculum Committee, five courses are being created to incorporate our NASJE Curriculum Designs in order to specifically address NASJE’s Core Competencies, i.e. Fundamentals, Leadership and Governance, Diversity, Grant Funding and Budgeting and Collaboration with Human Resources.

Longtime Educator Diane Cowdrey Retires

After nearly 28 years in Judicial Education, Diane Cowdrey of California has retired. Diane credits NASJE with the professionalization of judicial branch education, and is thankful for the network of colleagues NASJE provided for her during her career.

Judging Science in the Courthouse

This expanding universe of scientific knowledge has engendered many discussions about the perceived need to increase the amount of science based education judges receive. Some argue that judges should be educated like scientists. The problem intrinsic this idea is that judges are specialists in the law, and generalists in everything else. Moreover, the vast majority of judges turned away from a scientific education, at least by the time they were in college and certainly by the time they were in law school. Law school teaches a different manner of seeking the truth than the scientific method.

Report of the Education and Curriculum Committee

The Education and Curriculum Committee is hard at work on a number of initiatives designed to enhance the professional lives of judicial educators. The fifteen-member committee, co-chaired by Judith Anderson of Washington and Anthony Simones of Missouri, made the decision to split into three subcommittees in order to effectively achieve the goals of the group.

From the President (Winter 2017)

To my NASJE colleagues: As if you need any more reminders that the new year is upon us…I’m going to add my well wishes for a happy, healthy, educational 2017! So often, we think about January as a time for…

Phil Schopick Retires at Year End

Phil Schopick

After more than 25 years in Judicial Branch education, Phil Schopick of the Supreme Court of Ohio Judicial College is retiring. Phil was editor of NASJE News (the predecessor of our news and information website) for about 10 years and was active in NASJE on the international committee and communications committee.

Tax-deductible contributions to NASJE

Dear NASJE Colleagues, As I receive solicitations from other associations and organizations, I am reminded of my duties as NASJE’s President to … promote the growth of NASJE and the strengthening of its position within the court community and ensure NASJE’s…

Rethinking Learning Styles: Judicial Educators as Restless Learners

Judicial Branch Educators are restless learners. As such, they continually investigate new research on teaching and learning and on topics of interest to courts. They also need to be critical thinkers, constantly evaluating what they know and what they need to learn. Rethinking learning styles is just such a topic. There is much to know about learning styles, but well-tested and documented research goes against the widely accepted view that teachers should alter their teaching styles according to their learners’ learning styles in order to maximize learning. In addition, research casts doubt on the reliability of assessments designed to determine individual learning styles.