Author: NASJE

Member Minute: Eydie Trautwein

1. What was your path to judicial education? I am an attorney and started working at the Wyoming Supreme Court in 2013. Originally, I was the Wyoming Court Improvement Program (CIP) director, but in November, 2016, my job morphed into…

Judicial Education Manager Insights

Bryan Walker

My belief has always been that great teachers can teach anybody. The student’s age does not matter. My first disclaimer: I do not consider myself a great teacher. I have, however, found success as a teacher and coach. In my opinion, certificates and degrees have never determined the efficacy of a teacher. I have seen many teachers with Ph.Ds. who fail to connect with learners. As Jack Anderson Pidgeon, the headmaster of the private Kiski School in Saltsburg noted , “Teaching must flow from within. Teaching is an art.”

Member Minute: Introducing Alan Sparrow

The NASJE Membership Committee is pleased to introduce one of NASJE’s newest members: Alan Sparrow! Alan hails from the great state of Arizona, where he is an Education Specialist in the Education Technologies Unit. He was a good sport, and gamely answered some of the committee’s “Get-To-Know-You” questions.

2017 Karen Thorson Award Winner Announced

Michael Roosevelt

In February 2012, the NASJE board established the Karen Thorson Award to honor a NASJE member who has made a significant contribution to both NASJE and judicial branch education nationally. It is my great pleasure to announce this year’s Karen Thorson Award winner, also from California – Michael Roosevelt.

Register Now for the 2017 NASJE Conference, September 10-13

Charleston

Join us for NASJE’s Annual Conference on September 10-13 where “Old meets New: Incorporating Fundamentals, Instructional Design and Adult Learning into the 21st Century,” in historic Charleston, South Carolina. The 2017 Conference Committee has collaborated with the Curriculum Committee and the…

Judicial Forensic Science Education

As technology plays an increasingly significant role in our society, it has become commonplace in the courtroom. New technological practices and discoveries bring forensic science topics such as DNA, latent print examinations, and digital evidence to the forefront of our court system. With technology playing a greater and greater role in resolving cases, it became obvious to Arizona judicial educators that many judges lack the educational background needed for a sufficient understanding of the scientific principles behind the forensic evidence they see in court.

From the President (Spring 2017)

It is my pleasure to wish you a “Happy Spring” and to update you on all of the amazing work that is underway, through our committees and through our outreach and collaboration with our justice system partners.

Utah Courts Create Academies to Enhance Employees’ Career Advancement

In State Court systems around the country there are many positions that have a definitive career ladder but there are many that don’t. The Utah State courts Education Department has launched academies to help a wide range of employees prepare for advancement. Two academies were designed to prepare non-supervisory and middle-management employees for future higher level management and leadership opportunities. Even in their infancy, these academies have measurably enhanced the academy graduates’ management and leadership skills.

Access Info now available for June 27 “Rethinking Learning Styles” Webinar

Visual, auditory, kinesthetic. Diverger, Converger, Assimilator, Accommodator. Which learning style best describes you? How do you know? As an educator, were you taught to adapt your teaching to the learning styles of your audience? Have you actually done so? Do you know if it was effective? Recent research purports to debunk the “myth” of learning styles. Researchers claim that the learning style-teaching style link is unproven and that instruments to measure learning styles are inaccurate. In this session, we’ll review the social science research about learning styles and discuss what we as educators should rethink — if anything — because of it.

Article Club Callinar on Thursday, May 11

Life Balance Wheel

Vicarious trauma. Compassion fatigue. Second-hand shock. Burnout. The populations that judicial educators serve are at great risk for these overwhelming professional challenges. How could and should our programming combat the effects of working with and around traumatic events? Join NASJE’s latest Article Club Callinar, where you will have the opportunity to discuss the article about vicarious trauma experienced by court employees. We have also two self-care inventories examples that you can take prior to the callinar or whenever you like.

The Promise of Restorative Justice: Reduced Pressure on Courts, Reduced Recidivism, Increased Public Trust in the Rule of Law

In a thought provoking session at NASJE’s 2016 Annual Conference in Burlington, Vermont, Dr. Johannes Wheeldon and the Honorable David Suntag offered the underlying premises of restorative justice — while attempting to respond to criminal acts, the justice system itself causes harm, and the participation of those in the justice system is often limited to hiring a lawyer to navigate complex procedures. This lack of participation by those whose lives are affected leads to a default society. Restorative justice, on the other hand, demands meaningful participation and affords an opportunity to articulate our needs.

Hidden Treasures on the NASJE Website

The Education and Curriculum Committee hosted its first “Article Club” call-inar for 2017 on February 23. The call-inar, Hidden Treasures on the NASJE Website, focused on the hidden gems within the website. The “explorers” led 17 participants through the many “caverns” to discover the treasures that comprise the website as the participants followed along on their computers.

The Best of Charleston

Charleston

Does business casual include khakis and open-toed shoes? It certainly does where we are going! NASJE’s Annual Conference is September 10-13, 2017, in Charleston South Carolina, where the average temperature for September is in the mid-80s. There is a lot to see and do in the area, especially if you want to add a day or two to your trip either before or after the conference. Here are some highlights!

“We Are Charleston”

We Are Charleston

This book and conference location are the inspiration for “ELO, Charleston, South Carolina and Race: An Experiential Approach”, which revisits the tragedy and explores how race remains a salient issue in society. The session will include a visit to Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where the murders occurred, on-site discussion of the tragedy and where the country and justice system are with regards to race.

Law Day 2017

law day 2017

Law Day is held every year on May 1 for the purpose of celebrating the role of law in our society and to cultivate a deeper understanding of the legal profession. This year’s theme is “The 14th Amendment: Transforming American Democracy.” ABA President Linda Klein’s videotaped message is a good way to begin learning about this year’s theme.