Category: Featured

This is for articles we want in the sidebar.

From the President (Post-Irma / Fall 2017)

Well, NASJE Colleagues, I hadn’t exactly planned to write another “President’s Message,” but then again, I hadn’t planned on Hurricane Irma or any of the frantic activity that occurred as that storm barreled towards the east coast with Charleston in…

2017 Annual Conference Update

The 2017 NASJE Annual Conference has been rescheduled for December 3-6, 2017. We are fortunate to have been offered alternate dates at the same hotel after the September conference dates became unworkable due to Hurricane Irma. We are grateful to the staff at the Francis Marion hotel who worked hard to accommodate us and ensure a positive outcome for all concerned despite the storm.

2017 Karen Thorson Award Winner Announced

Michael Roosevelt

In February 2012, the NASJE board established the Karen Thorson Award to honor a NASJE member who has made a significant contribution to both NASJE and judicial branch education nationally. It is my great pleasure to announce this year’s Karen Thorson Award winner, also from California – Michael Roosevelt.

From the President (Spring 2017)

It is my pleasure to wish you a “Happy Spring” and to update you on all of the amazing work that is underway, through our committees and through our outreach and collaboration with our justice system partners.

Access Info now available for June 27 “Rethinking Learning Styles” Webinar

Visual, auditory, kinesthetic. Diverger, Converger, Assimilator, Accommodator. Which learning style best describes you? How do you know? As an educator, were you taught to adapt your teaching to the learning styles of your audience? Have you actually done so? Do you know if it was effective? Recent research purports to debunk the “myth” of learning styles. Researchers claim that the learning style-teaching style link is unproven and that instruments to measure learning styles are inaccurate. In this session, we’ll review the social science research about learning styles and discuss what we as educators should rethink — if anything — because of it.

Judging Science in the Courthouse

This expanding universe of scientific knowledge has engendered many discussions about the perceived need to increase the amount of science based education judges receive. Some argue that judges should be educated like scientists. The problem intrinsic this idea is that judges are specialists in the law, and generalists in everything else. Moreover, the vast majority of judges turned away from a scientific education, at least by the time they were in college and certainly by the time they were in law school. Law school teaches a different manner of seeking the truth than the scientific method.

Report of the Education and Curriculum Committee

The Education and Curriculum Committee is hard at work on a number of initiatives designed to enhance the professional lives of judicial educators. The fifteen-member committee, co-chaired by Judith Anderson of Washington and Anthony Simones of Missouri, made the decision to split into three subcommittees in order to effectively achieve the goals of the group.

Tax-deductible contributions to NASJE

Dear NASJE Colleagues, As I receive solicitations from other associations and organizations, I am reminded of my duties as NASJE’s President to … promote the growth of NASJE and the strengthening of its position within the court community and ensure NASJE’s…

Teaching Implicit Bias to Court Employees: Lessons from the Field

How do courts deal with issues such as the disproportion of minority representation in the criminal and juvenile justice systems? How can court employees and judges act to overcome the perception that the criminal justice system is biased towards minority populations, as shown in research at ProceduralFairness.org and elsewhere? Pima County courts chose to tackle implicit bias training as one facet of their efforts to combat these and related issues in courts in Tucson, Arizona.

IOJT Publishes 4th Issue of Judicial Education and Training

Judicial Education and Training

The International Organization for Judicial Training (IOJT) recently announced the publication of the fourth issue of Judicial Education and Training. This issue presents twelve articles, which primarily addresses four themes: Remote delivery of judicial education Diversity in South Asian approaches Core aspects of pedagogy…

Arizona’s Leadership Model

AZ Leadership Pipeline

Judicial educators create opportunities for transformative education that strengthens the administration of justice. One of the most important and valuable transformations we can facilitate is that from new hire to supervisor, manager, executive and beyond. It is just this sort of defined career pathway that attracts bright and justice-oriented individuals to a career in the courts.