Category: Educating Court Personnel

Dopamine Lollipops: Dr. John Medina’s Brain Rules!

DR. JOHN J. MEDINA

In his high-energy closing plenary session at NASJE’s 2015 annual conference, Dr. John Medina did a terrific job of informing and involving attendees. He vividly demonstrated how to apply research on learning and memory to judicial branch education. The “brain rules” he shared are worth revisiting, so this article will touch back on them and direct you where to go for more.

A Summary Report of the Faculty Development Program

By Philip J. Schopick, CCM | Program Manager, Judicial College | Supreme Court of Ohio Fewer things are more satisfying than seeing teaching done right. The faculty development program taught at NASJE’s 39th annual conference in Seattle truly fit the…

Diane Cowdrey: Navigating Judicial Education in Great Change

Diane Cowdrey

The NASJE Communications Committee will endeavor to periodically feature a spotlight on a NASJE member who has demonstrated tremendous efforts while “Navigating Judicial Education in Great Change.” The Committee members have voted to highlight NASJE member Diane Cowdrey (CA) who led the restructuring of the Center for Judiciary Education and Research (CJER) during the meltdown of the economy and the fiscal crisis for California’s judicial branch beginning in early 2008. Diane is the Director of CJER, in the Operations and Programs Division, Judicial Council of California.

Building a Bridge to Good Customer Service

Managers Briefcase

Court employees must provide good customer service, especially in light of the link between funding and how citizens feel about their courts. Good customer service translates into better overall feelings about the courts, and better overall feelings can translate into adequate funding.

Civics Education for Court Staff

According to The Nation’s Report Card, the official site for results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, high school seniors are falling behind in their understanding of government and civics, scoring less than 50% on national tests. And unless you pursue a career in law, government, or politics, it doesn’t get any better after high school.

New Feature: Educating Court Personnel

Sychronous or Asynchronous

Educating and training court personnel is every bit as important as educating our judges, but often it gets less airtime. So NASJE News is launching a new feature category exclusively dedicated to education for court personnel, starting with this article.