Janice Calvi-Ruimerman

From the President (Winter 2020)

My space is not my own. Articles that speak to me are kept close to remind me of my vision and my professional focus. My desk, seemingly large, has become ever so crowded by these professional reminders of what, I feel, are important or timely. On the plus side, these items prompt me daily to stay the course. In 2009, I came across an article about education and visioning for the future of the Courts; this has been my Codex ever since. As so pointedly stated in the article, Courts as a Learning Organization: Towards a Unifying Vision, “A learning organization is intended to be a catalyst for continual change.” That became my vision, my proposed unified vision.

Janice Calvi-Ruimerman

From the President (Fall 2019)

By NASJE President Janice Calvi-Ruimerman. For my first letter from the president, I feel it is important to negate a common misconception about our organization. I heard most recently someone describing me as, “she no longer does judicial education.” Interesting, I thought, then what do I do?

Anthony Simones

From the President (Summer 2019)

For my final presidential message, I am going to focus on gratitude. Never have I been more aware of the fact that great things do not happen with a single person acting alone. To those who helped me through this year, I bestow upon you my gratitude.

From the President (Spring 2019)

When I took office last year, I was asked repeatedly about my agenda as President of NASJE and what I hoped to accomplish. I struggled to provide an answer. My initial inclination was to say, “Continue the great work and follow the lead of the talented people who came before me.” My second reaction was even shorter and less impressive: “Try not to screw anything up.” But the more I thought about it, the more an answer began to materialize. I wanted to work to ensure that NASJE would continue to be the resource to others that it has been to me.

Anthony Simones

From the President (Winter 2019)

A few months ago, I asked a roomful of judicial educators whether they considered themselves court leaders. A surprisingly small number of people raised their hands to indicate that they saw themselves in this manner. I think to an extent their response was indicative of their acknowledgement that they did not sit atop the chain of command in their administrative structure. However, if that is to be the determinative factor, then very few of us are court leaders. I prefer to think of being a court leader as being able to have an impact on the direction the court will take and the way the judiciary will achieve its objectives. Seen from this perspective, I think it is undeniable that most of us are court leaders.

Anthony Simones

From the President (Fall 2018)

For my first written communication with the members of NASJE, I wanted to address a reality I think many of us know deep within, but rarely stop and give it the consideration it deserves. I want to talk about being a judicial educator. More to the point, I want to share my thoughts on what a special profession we are a part of. In Austin I talked with the Fundamentals class about these topics. I wanted to extend my observations to a broader audience.

Summer time and the living is busy!

As I write this message, it is the morning of June 21—the first official day of summer. I love this time of year in North Dakota. The days are long (official sunset at 9:41 today) and the nights are cool; perfect conditions for watching a beautiful sunset or having a campfire at the lake. As much as I would prefer spending my days near the water, there is work to be done to wrap up my presidency and prepare for our annual conference in August.

From the President (Spring 2018)

The board and the NASJE committees have been busy since we last met in Charleston. We are hard at work planning the 2018 Conference in Austin, Texas. It is scheduled for August 26-29, and the theme is “Developing Educational Leaders for Today’s Courts and Beyond.”

From the President (Winter 2018)

Welcome to 2018! If you are like me, you have probably set and broken a few New Year’s Resolutions by now. Instead of setting resolutions for NASJE, I thought we would work toward goals- less cliché and perhaps a little less pressure.